Risk of death and cancer for various levels of average alcohol consumption

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Alcohol is a psychoactive, dependence-producing substance that has been classified as a Group 1 carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).

The carcinogenic effects of alcohol consumption are well documented, and numerous studies have shown that alcohol consumption increases the risk of developing several types of cancer.

In this article, we will explore how alcohol interacts with cancer and the mechanisms by which alcohol consumption increases the risk of cancer.

Alcohol consumption is a widespread phenomenon that has been present in human societies for centuries. However, the patterns and levels of alcohol consumption vary significantly across nations worldwide. In this article, we will explore alcohol consumption in different countries and regions of the world, including their cultural attitudes towards alcohol, historical background, and current trends.

Europe

Europe has a long history of alcohol consumption, and many countries in this region have a significant culture of drinking. The highest alcohol consumption rates in Europe are found in countries such as Lithuania, Czech Republic, and Estonia, where people consume on average over 13 liters of pure alcohol per year. In contrast, countries like Turkey, Albania, and Azerbaijan have much lower consumption rates, with an average of fewer than 2 liters per year. However, it is essential to note that there are significant variations in alcohol consumption patterns within countries.

In general, wine and beer are the most popular alcoholic beverages in Europe, and the consumption of spirits is relatively low. In countries such as France, Italy, and Spain, wine is an essential part of their cultural heritage and is consumed regularly with meals. In contrast, beer is more popular in countries like Germany and the Czech Republic, where it is consumed in large quantities at social gatherings and events.

North America

In North America, the United States has the highest alcohol consumption rate, with an average of 9.3 liters of pure alcohol per year. Canada and Mexico have lower consumption rates, with an average of around 8 and 5 liters per year, respectively.

In the United States, alcohol consumption is prevalent, and many people consume alcohol regularly, often in social settings. However, attitudes towards alcohol consumption vary significantly across the country, with some states having much higher consumption rates than others. The most popular alcoholic beverages in the United States are beer and wine, and the consumption of spirits is relatively low.

Central and South America

Central and South America have a long history of alcohol consumption, with a particular focus on traditional drinks such as tequila, rum, and pisco. Countries such as Peru, Chile, and Ecuador have high levels of alcohol consumption, with an average of around 8 liters of pure alcohol per year. In contrast, countries such as Costa Rica and Honduras have much lower consumption rates, with an average of fewer than 4 liters per year.

Alcohol consumption in Central and South America is often associated with social events and celebrations, such as weddings and festivals. Traditional alcoholic beverages such as tequila and rum are widely consumed in these countries, and many people also drink beer and wine.

Asia

In Asia, alcohol consumption varies significantly from country to country, with some countries having high levels of alcohol consumption, while others have low levels. The highest alcohol consumption rates in Asia are found in countries such as Japan, South Korea, and China, with an average of around 6 liters of pure alcohol per year. In contrast, countries such as Iran, Pakistan, and Bangladesh have much lower consumption rates, with an average of fewer than 1 liter per year.

Alcohol consumption in Asia is often linked to cultural and religious beliefs, and attitudes towards alcohol can vary significantly across different countries and regions. In countries such as Japan and South Korea, traditional alcoholic beverages such as sake and soju are widely consumed, while in China, beer and baijiu are popular.

Africa

Alcohol consumption in Africa is relatively low compared to other regions, with an average of around 3 liters of pure alcohol per year. However, there are significant variations in alcohol consumption patterns across different countries and regions.

In countries such as South Africa and Namibia, alcohol consumption is relatively high, with a particular focus on beer and wine. In contrast, countries such as Somalia and Sudan have very low levels of alcohol consumption, primarily due to religious and cultural beliefs that prohibit or discourage the consumption of alcohol.

Alcohol consumption in Africa is often associated with social events and celebrations, such as weddings and festivals. Traditional alcoholic beverages such as palm wine and sorghum beer are widely consumed in some parts of the continent, while imported beer and wine are popular in other regions.

Australia and New Zealand

Australia and New Zealand have some of the highest alcohol consumption rates in the world, with an average of around 10 liters of pure alcohol per year. Alcohol consumption is prevalent in these countries, and many people consume alcohol regularly, often in social settings. Beer and wine are the most popular alcoholic beverages in Australia and New Zealand, with the consumption of spirits being relatively low.

let’s dive deeper into the effects of alcohol consumption on brain development.

Adolescence

During adolescence, the brain undergoes significant changes as it develops and matures. The prefrontal cortex, which is responsible for decision-making, impulse control, and other complex cognitive processes, is still developing during this time. Exposure to alcohol during this critical period can interfere with the normal development of the brain, leading to long-term changes in brain structure and function.

Studies have shown that alcohol consumption during adolescence can lead to changes in white matter in the brain, which affects the brain’s ability to process information efficiently. It can also interfere with the development of the hippocampus, a region of the brain responsible for memory and learning.

Adolescent alcohol consumption can also lead to changes in the brain’s reward system, making it more likely that a person will continue to engage in risky behaviors such as excessive drinking or drug use. This can increase the risk of developing addiction later in life.

Young Adulthood

The effects of alcohol consumption on brain development during young adulthood are similar to those seen during adolescence. However, the impact of alcohol consumption during this period can be more significant, as the brain is still developing and maturing.

Excessive alcohol consumption during young adulthood can lead to changes in brain structure and function, affecting cognitive abilities such as attention, memory, and executive function. It can also affect emotional regulation, leading to behavioral problems such as impulsivity, aggression, and risk-taking behavior.

Heavy alcohol consumption during young adulthood can also increase the risk of developing alcohol dependence and other substance use disorders. This is because young adults who engage in heavy drinking are more likely to engage in risky behaviors and have a higher tolerance for alcohol, increasing their risk of developing addiction.

Middle Adulthood

The impact of alcohol consumption on brain development during middle adulthood is less clear. While heavy alcohol consumption can lead to changes in brain structure and function, the brain is less susceptible to these changes than it is during adolescence and young adulthood.

However, heavy alcohol consumption during middle adulthood can lead to cognitive decline, affecting abilities such as memory, attention, and executive function. It can also increase the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia.

Older Adulthood

Alcohol consumption during older adulthood can also have a significant impact on brain function. Heavy alcohol consumption can lead to cognitive decline and an increased risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease.

Moderate alcohol consumption may have some protective effects on brain function in older adults. Studies have shown that moderate alcohol consumption can improve cognitive function and reduce the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases.

Alcohol and cancer risk:

There is a strong association between alcohol consumption and the risk of developing several types of cancer, including:

  • Head and neck cancer
  • Esophageal cancer
  • Liver cancer
  • Breast cancer
  • Colorectal cancer

Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain how alcohol consumption increases the risk of cancer.

  1. Ethanol metabolism:

Alcohol is metabolized by the liver, and the primary metabolite of ethanol is acetaldehyde, which is a toxic and carcinogenic compound. Acetaldehyde can damage DNA, proteins, and lipids, leading to mutations and the development of cancer. Chronic alcohol consumption can also lead to an accumulation of acetaldehyde in the body, further increasing the risk of cancer.

  1. Oxidative stress:

Alcohol metabolism produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can cause oxidative stress and damage to cellular components, including DNA, leading to mutations and the development of cancer.

  1. Alteration of hormone levels:

Alcohol consumption can alter the levels of hormones such as estrogen and testosterone, which are associated with the development of breast and prostate cancer, respectively.

  1. Nutritional deficiencies:

Chronic alcohol consumption can lead to nutritional deficiencies, such as folate and vitamin B6, which are important for DNA synthesis and repair, and can increase the risk of cancer.

  1. Immune system suppression:

Alcohol consumption can suppress the immune system, making individuals more susceptible to infections and increasing the risk of cancer.

Alcohol and cancer treatment:

Alcohol consumption can also affect cancer treatment outcomes. Studies have shown that alcohol consumption during cancer treatment can increase the risk of treatment-related toxicity, reduce treatment efficacy, and increase the risk of cancer recurrence. Alcohol consumption can also interact with certain cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and increase their toxicity.

The breakdown of alcohol in the body begins in the liver, where the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts ethanol (the primary component of alcohol) into acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde is a highly reactive and toxic substance that can cause DNA damage and interfere with the normal function of cells.

The body has another enzyme, called aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), that converts acetaldehyde into a less harmful substance called acetate. However, some individuals have a genetic variant that reduces the activity of ALDH, leading to a buildup of acetaldehyde in the body after drinking alcohol.

Acetaldehyde can bind to DNA and form adducts, which are chemical bonds between the acetaldehyde molecule and the DNA molecule. These adducts can interfere with DNA replication and repair, leading to mutations that can contribute to the development of cancer. Additionally, acetaldehyde can disrupt the normal functioning of proteins in the body, leading to further cellular damage and potentially contributing to the development of cancer.

In addition to the direct effects of acetaldehyde, alcohol consumption can also lead to an increase in oxidative stress in the body. Oxidative stress occurs when there is an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the body’s ability to neutralize them with antioxidants. Alcohol consumption can increase the production of ROS, leading to cellular damage and inflammation that can contribute to the development of cancer.

Alcohol consumption has also been linked to changes in hormone levels that may contribute to the development of hormone-related cancers such as breast and prostate cancer. For example, alcohol consumption can increase levels of estrogen in women, which has been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer.

The risk of developing cancer increases substantially the more alcohol is consumed. Half of all alcohol-attributable cancers in the WHO European Region are caused by “light” and “moderate” alcohol consumption – less than 1.5 litres of wine or less than 3.5 litres of beer or less than 450 millilitres of spirits per week.

This drinking pattern is responsible for the majority of alcohol-attributable breast cancers in women, with the highest burden observed in countries of the European Union (EU). Cancer is the leading cause of death in the EU, and the majority of all alcohol-attributable deaths are due to different types of cancers.

Scientific evidence has not been able to identify a “safe” level of alcohol consumption. Currently available evidence cannot indicate the existence of a threshold at which the carcinogenic effects of alcohol “switch on” and start to manifest in the human body.

Furthermore, there are no studies that demonstrate that the potential beneficial effects of light and moderate drinking on cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes outweigh the cancer risk associated with these same levels of alcohol consumption for individual consumers.

“We cannot talk about a so-called safe level of alcohol use. It doesn’t matter how much you drink – the risk to the drinker’s health starts from the first drop of any alcoholic beverage. The only thing that we can say for sure is that the more you drink, the more harmful it is – or, in other words, the less you drink, the safer it is,” explains Dr Carina Ferreira-Borges, acting Unit Lead for Noncommunicable Disease Management and Regional Advisor for Alcohol and Illicit Drugs in the WHO Regional Office for Europe.

In August 2022, Canada released an updated version of its Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines. The guidelines aim to provide Canadians with the most current information on the risks associated with alcohol consumption and help individuals make informed decisions about their drinking habits.

Here are the key takeaways from the updated guidelines:

  1. No amount of alcohol is completely risk-free. Even small amounts of alcohol consumption can lead to some degree of harm, including an increased risk of cancer and other health issues.
  2. To minimize the risk of harm, it is recommended that individuals limit their alcohol consumption to no more than:
  • 10 standard drinks per week for women, with no more than 2 drinks per day on most days.
  • 15 standard drinks per week for men, with no more than 3 drinks per day on most days.
  1. It is also recommended that individuals have at least 2 alcohol-free days per week to allow the body time to recover.
  2. The guidelines note that the risk of harm increases with higher levels of alcohol consumption. Consuming more than the recommended limits can lead to a range of health problems, including an increased risk of cancer, liver disease, and mental health issues.
  3. The guidelines also emphasize the importance of safe and responsible drinking practices. This includes avoiding drinking and driving, never drinking while pregnant, and being mindful of the impact of alcohol on others.

Overall, the updated guidelines aim to promote a culture of moderation and responsibility when it comes to alcohol consumption. While alcohol can be enjoyed in moderation, it is important to be aware of the potential risks and take steps to minimize them.

The guidelines also acknowledge that individual factors, such as age, gender, and health status, can impact how alcohol affects the body. As such, individuals are encouraged to speak with their healthcare provider about their alcohol consumption and any potential risks.

In addition to the guidelines themselves, the report also includes a range of resources and tools to help Canadians make informed decisions about their alcohol consumption. These include a standard drink calculator, tips for reducing alcohol consumption, and information on where to seek help for alcohol-related problems.

Conclusion

In conclusion, alcohol consumption is a widespread phenomenon that varies significantly across different countries and regions of the world. While some countries have high levels of alcohol consumption, others have much lower levels due to cultural, religious, and historical factors. Attitudes towards alcohol also vary significantly across different countries and regions, with some countries having a significant culture of drinking, while others have strict laws and regulations governing alcohol consumption.

It is essential to note that excessive alcohol consumption can have negative health consequences, including liver disease, high blood pressure, and an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Therefore, it is essential to consume alcohol in moderation and to be aware of the potential risks associated with excessive alcohol consumption.

Governments and health organizations can play a crucial role in promoting responsible alcohol consumption and reducing the negative health consequences associated with excessive alcohol consumption. This can include initiatives such as increasing public awareness of the potential risks of excessive alcohol consumption, promoting responsible drinking, and implementing effective policies and regulations to reduce the availability and accessibility of alcohol to minors and those at risk of developing alcohol-related health problems.


reference link :

https://ccsa.ca/sites/default/files/2022-08/CCSA-LRDG-Update-of-Canada%27s-LRDG-Final-report-for-public-consultation-en.pdf

https://www.cancer.gov/news-events/cancer-currents-blog/2023/cancer-alcohol-link-public-awareness

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